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SUBMISSIONS

CONTACT INFORMATION

 

For appearance information contact Bob Shaw of Comic Art House.

 

For anything else please contact us at SALES@HIGHBURN.COM.

 

For Book or Title Submission:

Acceptable Formats: Adobe PDf

We do offer publishing whether you have a one-shot mini-comic that you stapled yourself, do a daily webcomic you want to collect and sell, or are just in the beginning stages of starting your comic empire we want you to submit your work to us.


Note that our mission isn't to publish every comic we get, which means that we won't automatically accept everything for distribution. We reserve the right to reject any submission. We'll have a team of people looking at the quality of each submission. The high quality of our ongoing titles will be the key to our success, and something that we do not take lightly. For this reason we will be choosy about what type of content we accept.

You can only submit one comic book or graphic novel at a time. If that work gets rejected you can always resubmit it with revised content or submit another comic .


You must own the copyright or have the necessary rights for any content you submit.

 

Submissions not adhering to the above listed specifications WILL NOT be considered.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For Writers:

Todd’s Tips
The following books really helped me when I was getting started.
How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way by Stan Lee and John Buscema – Yes…an ART book. At some point, you’re gonna need to communicate with an artist. It will be much easier if you speak the same technical language. You’d be surprised how many aspiring comic artists I’ve met that don’t know what a “gutter” is.
Ultimate Spider-Man Script Book by Brian Michael Bendis – The intro of this book freaked me out because it felt like BMB was spying on me. And let’s be honest, nobody writes dialogue like Brian.
Queen & Country Scriptbook Volume 1 by Greg Rucka – To weave a tale that takes place in the real world of international counter intelligence and high-stakes black-ops missions takes some serious attention to detail…nobody does it better than Greg.

    Writing for Comics with Peter David by Peter David.
     Feature Filmmaking at Used-Car Prices by Rick Schmidt, pages 7-44.

Writer’s Submissions

Acceptable Formats: MS Word or Adobe PDF

Option 1
Your writing resume with 3 references (no family members).
File Name: (Author Name) – RESUME


First 12 pages of full script of an original story (you wrote) based on an existing character (not from Highburn Studios).
File Name: (TITLE) – pgs1-12 of (Total#) by (Author Name)
Your story - 1 page treatment
File Name: (TITLE) – Treatment by (Author Name)

Or

Option 2
Your writing resume with 3 references.
File Name: (Author Name) – RESUME
First 12 pages of full script of an original story (you wrote) based on an existing character (not from Highburn Studios).
File Name: (TITLE) – pgs1-12 of (Total#) by (Author Name)
First 8 pages of your original story’s full script
File Name: (TITLE) – pgs1-8 of (Total#) by (Author Name)

Writing Sub
Submissions not adhering to the above listed specifications WILL NOT be considered.



For Pencilers or Complete Artists:

Acceptable Formats: Adobe PDF or JPGs

Send three to six pages of sequential art. Demonstrate your ability to tell a story using sequential panels and pages. Choose a story that allows you to showcase not only your strong points but utilizes a wide range of settings, situations, props and character types. If possible include the story/plot pages you worked from.


You may also include one to two pinup or cover type work if you wish. It is very rare that any artist is hired anywhere purely for pinup or cover work.


Quick tips:
1. Backgrounds are as important as dynamic figures! If you send us some great pinup work but either not enough or bland backgrounds you will most likely get filed in the trash. Give us a showcase of all your skills.


2. Use a variety of camera angles, depths of shots, and shot selections on each page. The easiest way for an editor to spot a novice penciler is medium shot after medium shot. Your pages don't just have to be competent, they have to be exciting!


3. Your first job is to tell the story. Is your story-telling clear and easy to understand even without the dialogue?


4. Hands and feet. Editors look at characters' hands and feet.

Submissions not adhering to the above listed specifications WILL NOT be considered.


For Inkers:


Acceptable Formats: Adobe PDF or JPGs


Send three to six pages of sequential art. We need to see the original penciled pages for comparison, so be sure to send them as well. Pick pages with the widest range of textures and techniques possible. Choose the type of artist you feel you are most comfortable with and would like to work over. Be sure the pages, or single pieces, you use contain a variety of faces, well-realized backgrounds and figure work.

Quick tips:
1. Be true to the artist's intent. Your job is to strengthen and enhance the penciler's work, not over-ride it with your own intent. Make sure you understand what the artist is trying to convey (shape, shadow, texture) with every line.


2. Separate forms and create depth by using varying line thickness, breaking up lines, and different rendering techniques. This is one of the inker's primary jobs.


3. The tool you use to ink is not important, but use the right tool for the job. Classic tools like nibs and brushes rarely fail in a skilled hand. Typically, technical pens and markers will not give your line the life it needs to enhance the original pencils. Digital inking is an emerging discipline, but remember that computers are no substitute for technique.


4. Vary your technique to convey texture. Metal should not be rendered with the same technique as fur or wood for example.

Submissions not adhering to the above listed specifications WILL NOT be considered.

For Colorists


Acceptable Formats: Adobe PDF or JPGs


Send three to six pages of sequential art. We need to see the inked & uncolored pages as well, so be sure to include them with your coloring samples for comparison. Include pages with scene progression, action and quiet scenes, a variety of backgrounds, figures, and faces. Show us you can utilize color to evoke a mood, are conscious of and consistent with lighting, and can clearly separate a scene. Pinups are welcomed as well. Showing a variety of styles and techniques is not necessarily a bad idea, but remember that just like pencilers we are looking for individual voices in colorists, not utility production players.

Quick tips:
1. Color theory is a must. Computers are useful tools, just like paintbrushes or markers, for coloring, but a fundamental understanding of color theory is a must for professional colorists.


2. Select pencilers or inkers whose style suits your style of coloring. Colorists are not interchangeable with any penciler or inker and certain techniques or styles are better suited for certain artists.


3. Your primary job is to enhance what the artist drew, elevating it beyond black and white.


4. Study lighting theory. Many times you will be asked to provide information on the light sources, light intensity, and in some cases, complex multiple source environment.

Submissions not adhering to the above listed specifications WILL NOT be considered.

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